Community Mapping for Disaster Risk Reduction and Management

Harnessing Local Knowledge to Build Resilience in the Philippines

In May 2013, the World Bank, the Department of Interior and Local Government, and the Institute of Environmental Science for Social Change launched a project on Community Mapping and LGU Decision Support Tools for Disaster Risk Reduction and Management in the Philippines.

Through ESSC, the project provided training and capacity building using OSM and InaSAFE including development of learning materials, assistance in monitoring data edits and online forum support. The Provincial Government of Pampanga and the municipalities of Candaba, Lubao and Guagua actively participated in the series of workshops and consultation meetings, shared their time and resources especially in data collection, collaborative editing, impact analysis and contingency planning. Technical assistance was also extended by DILG and Project NOAH.

The Expanding Role for Open Data in Burkina Faso

Program Gains Wider Use in the Transitional Government (April 2015)

The widening drive to provide open data in the public sector has taken a new turn in Burkina Faso. Open data has always been recognized as an enabler of economic development and government transparency. But in October 2014, when a popular uprising ousted Burkina Faso’s long-standing leader and established a transitional government, the country’s nascent Burkina open data initiative (BODI) took on new life as an enabler of the transition.

With support from the ODI and the World Bank, BODI had debuted just four months before the uprising, showcasing about 50 data sets of government information and an app that focused on education. In the months since then, the development of BODI has only accelerated, with more staff, more data sets posted, and new applications launched or planned. Under the transitional government, BODI has expanded with a web page for finding data on government contract awards and a program to help track and manage the country’s persistent drought problems. And BODI envisions a polling-place finder and reporting of vote totals as ways to support turnout and transparency for the scheduled October 2015 national elections.

Planning An Open Cities Mapping Project

This guide discusses the rationale and design of the Open Cities Project, the major components of its implementation to date, and some of the most salient lessons learned from the project so far. The Open Cities Project launched its efforts in three cities: Batticaloa, Sri Lanka; Dhaka, Bangladesh; and Kathmandu, Nepal. These cities were chosen for:

  • Their high levels of disaster risk;
  • The presence of World Bank-lending activities related to urban planning and disaster management that would benefit from access to better data;
  • The willingness of government counterparts to participate in and help guide the interventions.

In each of these projects, Open Cities has supported the creation of new data while also attending to the cities’ broader ecosystems of open data production and use.

Leveraging robust, accurate data to improve urban planning and disaster risk management decisions requires not only high-quality information but also the requisite tools, skills, and willingness to commit to a data-driven decision-making process. With this in mind, Open Cities also has developed partnerships across government ministries, donor agencies, universities, private sector technology groups, and civil society organizations to ensure broad acceptance of the data produced, facilitate data use, and align investments across projects and sectors.

The guide is intended for practitioners who wish to bring community mapping initiatives to their cities or regions. Community mapping efforts often result in increased awareness of disaster risk within governments and a consensus within ministries that this risk must be reduced.

Open Data Barometer 3rd Edition – Regional Report Latin America

The 3rd Edition of the World Wide Web Foundation’s Open Data Barometer (ODB), released in April 2016 and covering 92 countries, ranks nations on three open data criteria:

  • Readiness: How prepared are governments for open data initiatives? What policies are in place?
  • Implementation: Are governments putting their commitments into practice?
  • Impact: Is open government data being used in ways that bring practical benefit?

In this regional report we dig deeper into the Barometer’s results to take a closer look at the performance of the 11 countries in the Latin America region featured in the latest edition. The purpose of this regional analysis is to use the rich data to assess the state of play of open data across the region, evaluating the readiness of governments to implement open data practice and realise its potential to impact positively on the lives of citizens.

Africa Data Consensus

At their 23rd Ordinary Session of the African Union held in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea in June 2014, African Heads of State requested ECA, AUC, AfDB and UNDP to organize a High Level Conference to discuss the data revolution in Africa and its implications for African Union’s
Agenda 2063 and the post‐2015 development agenda. The High Level Conference on Data Revolution was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from 27 to 29 March 2015, culminating in this Africa Data Consensus.