Open Up Guide: Testing how to use open data to combat corruption in Mexico

In late 2017, México decided to become the first country in the world to implement the Guide and test its assumptions. It also became the first country to embed the Guide as an official standard in its Open Data Policy and to actively use it as part of its national anti-corruption efforts.

The teams of the Open Data Charter, Transparencia MexicanaCívica Digital and the Government Open Data team, with the financial help of the Inter American Development Bank, worked together for 6 months. Together we identified, released, analyzed, increased the quality, and promoted the use of Anticorruption related open data at the Executive branch in the country.

The result was the identification of 72 specific data resources that match the recommendations of the Guide. 47 of these datasets — which contain more than 12 million registries and 350 million data points — have already been released in the Mexican Open Data Platform datos.gob.mx.

Furthermore, and maybe most importantly for the future of the Open up Guides, the datasets are already being used in various projects to generate impact, for example:

  • Open Contracting data was used by IMCO and OPI Analytics to generate a Corruption Contracting Index.
  • Fiscal declaration open data was used by the civil society organization Data Cívica to generate new open datasets that would have cost the government more than a million pesos to generate.
  • Open Fiscal data was used in a hackathon during Open Data Day 2018 to generate visualizations around federal spending.
  • Open Contracting data is being used by the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Public Administration in the National Open Contracting Platform gob.mx/contratacionesabiertas.

For Mexico, this implementation is only the first step towards combating corruption with a data-driven approach. In the coming weeks, the Executive Secretariat of the National Anticorruption System will officially adopt the Guide and its results to serve as their steward, but also to use this data to generate intelligence to fight corruption in the country.

G8 Open Data Charter

G8 leaders signed the Open Data Charter on 18 June 2013.

The Open Data Charter sets out 5 strategic principles that all G8 members will act on. These include an expectation that all government data will be published openly by default, alongside principles to increase the quality, quantity and re-use of the data that is released. G8 members have also identified 14 high-value areas – from education to transport, and from health to crime and justice – from which they will release data. These will help unlock the economic potential of open data, support innovation and provide greater accountability.

Open Data Roadmap for the UK

Open data has emerged as a core component of the UK’s commitment to open policy-making. It is key to the digital transformation of government, which will only continue to increase in pace with the next parliament.

The UK has already taken steps to harness the benefits of open data for improved policy-making, and social, environmental and economic benefit. The Open Data Institute’s open data roadmap sets out steps the government can take to continue to drive progress.