Connecting the Dots: Building the Case for Open Data to Fight Corruption

An assessment of the implementation of the G20 open data anti-corruption principles by five G20 countries.

In 2015 the anti-corruption principles were developed based on the Open Data Charter. This was a first step towards leveraging open data as a crucial tool for enabling a culture of transparency and accountability in order to address corruption.

The purpose of this overview report is to make the case for using open data to strengthen anti-corruption efforts. The report, which was jointly conceived and carried out by Transparency International and the Web Foundation, assesses the extent to which a select group of G20 countries (Brazil, France, Germany, Indonesia and South Africa) have met their commitments to fight corruption by applying and implementing the principles and actions set out in the G20 Principles. This report also provides a set of recommendations for further action based on that assessment.

Open Data Barometer 3rd Edition – Regional Report Latin America

The 3rd Edition of the World Wide Web Foundation’s Open Data Barometer (ODB), released in April 2016 and covering 92 countries, ranks nations on three open data criteria:

  • Readiness: How prepared are governments for open data initiatives? What policies are in place?
  • Implementation: Are governments putting their commitments into practice?
  • Impact: Is open government data being used in ways that bring practical benefit?

In this regional report we dig deeper into the Barometer’s results to take a closer look at the performance of the 11 countries in the Latin America region featured in the latest edition. The purpose of this regional analysis is to use the rich data to assess the state of play of open data across the region, evaluating the readiness of governments to implement open data practice and realise its potential to impact positively on the lives of citizens.

The Global Impact of Open Data

Recent years have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over open data. Several studies have documented its potential to spur economic innovation and social transformation, and to usher in fresh forms of political and government accountability. Yet for all the enthusiasm, we know little about how open data actually works, and what forms of impact it is really having.

This report seeks to remedy that informational shortcoming. Supported by Omidyar Network, the GovLab has conducted 19 detailed case studies of open data projects around the world. The case studies were selected for their sectoral and geographic representativeness. They were built in part from secondary sources (“desk research”), but also from a number of first-hand interviews with important players and key stakeholders. They are presented at length, in narrative format, on an online repository, Open Data’s Impact (odimpact.org). In this paper, we consider some overarching lessons that can be learned from the case studies and assemble them within an analytical framework that can help us better understand what works, and what doesn’t, when it comes to open data.

Open Spending

OpenSpending exists to map the money worldwide – that is, to track and analyse public financial information globally. It is meant to be a resource for individuals and groups who wish to discuss and investigate public financial information, including journalists, academics, campaigners, and more. Concretely, OpenSpending is:

  • A central, high-quality, open platform for public financial information, including budgets, spending, balance sheets, procurement etc
  • A community of users and contributors to this database
  • A set of open resources providing technical, fiscal, and political understanding necessary to work with financial information.

Open Data Portals

DataPortals.org is the most comprehensive list of open data portals in the world. It is curated by a group of leading open data experts from around the world – including representatives from local, regional and national governments, international organisations such as the World Bank, and numerous NGOs.