Connecting the Dots: Building the Case for Open Data to Fight Corruption

An assessment of the implementation of the G20 open data anti-corruption principles by five G20 countries.

In 2015 the anti-corruption principles were developed based on the Open Data Charter. This was a first step towards leveraging open data as a crucial tool for enabling a culture of transparency and accountability in order to address corruption.

The purpose of this overview report is to make the case for using open data to strengthen anti-corruption efforts. The report, which was jointly conceived and carried out by Transparency International and the Web Foundation, assesses the extent to which a select group of G20 countries (Brazil, France, Germany, Indonesia and South Africa) have met their commitments to fight corruption by applying and implementing the principles and actions set out in the G20 Principles. This report also provides a set of recommendations for further action based on that assessment.

Africa Data Consensus

At their 23rd Ordinary Session of the African Union held in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea in June 2014, African Heads of State requested ECA, AUC, AfDB and UNDP to organize a High Level Conference to discuss the data revolution in Africa and its implications for African Union’s
Agenda 2063 and the post‐2015 development agenda. The High Level Conference on Data Revolution was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from 27 to 29 March 2015, culminating in this Africa Data Consensus.

Open Contracting Data Standard

Open data is a powerful tool to track contracting processes, and to gain insights into what is going on inside them. When data and documents on contracting are available in a structured, re-usable form, new opportunities for analysis and engagement are unlocked.

The Open Contracting Data Standard was created to be a global, non-proprietary data standard structured to reflect the complete contracting cycle. The standard enables users and partners around the world to publish shareable, reusable, machine readable data, to join that data with their own information, and to create tools to analyze or share that data.

The data standard was designed and developed through an open process. It is focused on connecting up the data or documents that governments collect with the needs of users who want to help fix problems, analyze public contracting, and innovate the way contracts are made and delivered.

Open Data Policy Guidelines

The Sunlight Foundation created this living set of open data guidelines to address: what data should be public, how to make data public, and how to implement policy. The provisions are not ranked in order of priority and do not address every question one should consider when preparing a policy, but are a guide to answer the question of what an open data policy can and should do in striving to create a government data ecosystem where open data is the default. Setting the default to open means that the government and parties acting on its behalf will make public information available proactively and that they’ll put that information within reach of the public (online), without barriers for its reuse and consumption. Setting the default to open is about living up to the potential of our information, about looking at comprehensive information management and making determinations that fall in the public interest.